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Algeria, North Africa
Population: 39,542,000
Chief of State: President Abdelaziz Bouteflika
Head of Gov.: Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal
Christians: 1.5%
Evangelical Christians: 1.4%
Dominant Religion: Islam
Persecution Ranking: 22nd
Life Expectancy: 75.41 Years
Literacy Rate: 91.8%
Population Below Poverty Line: 23%
Refugees Living in Algeria: 99,005

Pray for Algeria - facebook page

Tens of thousands of Algerians have descended into the grand colonial boulevards of the capital and other cities. Triggered by the prospect of a fifth presidential term for an ailing octogenarian rarely seen in public, the protests have called for an end to the police state. They call it the “Revolution of Smiles,” a tidal wave of optimism and goodwill coursing through the streets demanding a new system of government and, in a sense, a new nation. But there is an undercurrent of anxiety. Although Algeria is a young country, with about 70 percent of its people under 30, the grandparents and parents in the crowd remember its darker days — the broken promises of national liberation in the early 1960s, the “black years” of civil war in the 1990s — and worry history might take a similar turn this time.

Pray for a new system of government will unfold.
Pray for the young generation will get a peaceful revolutionary leader (The Bible, Hosea 1:11).

On Algerian streets, hope for revolutionary change. But history haunts the protesters

Back to World Map
Algeria, North Africa
Population: 39,542,000
Chief of State: President Abdelaziz Bouteflika
Head of Gov.: Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal
Christians: 1.5%
Evangelical Christians: 1.4%
Dominant Religion: Islam
Persecution Ranking: 22nd
Life Expectancy: 75.41 Years
Literacy Rate: 91.8%
Population Below Poverty Line: 23%
Refugees Living in Algeria: 99,005

Pray for Algeria - facebook page

Tens of thousands of Algerians have descended into the grand colonial boulevards of the capital and other cities. Triggered by the prospect of a fifth presidential term for an ailing octogenarian rarely seen in public, the protests have called for an end to the police state. They call it the “Revolution of Smiles,” a tidal wave of optimism and goodwill coursing through the streets demanding a new system of government and, in a sense, a new nation. But there is an undercurrent of anxiety. Although Algeria is a young country, with about 70 percent of its people under 30, the grandparents and parents in the crowd remember its darker days — the broken promises of national liberation in the early 1960s, the “black years” of civil war in the 1990s — and worry history might take a similar turn this time.

Pray for a new system of government will unfold.
Pray for the young generation will get a peaceful revolutionary leader (The Bible, Hosea 1:11).

On Algerian streets, hope for revolutionary change. But history haunts the protesters